Posts Tagged ‘#work’

(C) MSK 9-14-2018

She looks so happy

From the outside, many of us do.

Sure and in control

Man, I wish that were true.

 

For every question

So sure we have all the answers.

Act as if we’re immune

To weakness, disease and cancers.

 

He stands there so calm.

No sign that he’s ready to explode.

Sleeves rolled up: digs in

This close to just running down the road.

 

There is no training for this.

Won’t find it on utube or Internet search.

There is no training for this.

                 No help from lawyers, police or church.

 

For every question

So sure we have all the answers.

Talk as if we’re not human

Just crazy, drugged up dancers.

                                                                                                              MSK ©  9-12-2018

Faded jeans and worn-out shoes

You gotta dress right when you sing the Blues.

Down trodden with a broken heart

Don’t even try unless you look the part.

 

You Gotta Dress Right

Gotta-haves that go on forever.

You Gotta Dress Right

Come in every size, shape and flavor.

You Gotta Dress Right

No place for losers kid; be all you can be.

You Gotta Dress Right

If you want to sing the Blues like me.

 

Million dollar suit and ties

On thousands of rehearsed handshakes and smiles.

Each one willing to beat the rest

No excuses, no failure: this is no test.

 

You Gotta Dress Right

Gotta-haves that go on forever

You Gotta Dress Right

Come in every size, shape and flavor.

You Gotta Dress Right

No place for losers kid; be all you can be

You Gotta Dress Right

If you want to sing the Blues like me.

Letter 307

On-street-parking.  I know I will get a lot of kick-back for this one but I think we should end on-street-parking.  Even in residential and business districts.  Safety issues, snow clearance, traffic flow, and maintenance costs come to mind immediately.  I know many areas do not have much parking space for residents and there are more multiple car families than in the past.  Businesses also benefit if customers can park right in front of their stores.  But I am not sure this is worth blocking local traffic including emergency vehicles, utility companies, snow plows and the like in areas easily affected by weather, accidents, building fires and a host of other challenges.

Still, if we are planning a city or community, let’s plan on eliminating this practice entirely.  Just think how much this would ease congestion, improve safety, reduce city road maintenance costs, allow for emergency vehicles and unexpected weather or unusual events and improve the look and health of our streets and neighborhoods.

Let me know what you think.  What would you suggest to your city planners?

Letter 306

Here are two little things that bug me about traffic patterns and planning.  Maybe it is just me, but if I am driving in residential or even business areas where there are a lot of intersections, I think it is weird and dangerous when you come to an intersection but the traffic coming from a dead-end street does not have to stop.  This seems to happen a lot where a main road ends in cul de sacs where the “dead-end” is only one block long.  Not much traffic comes from there and it is easy to miss the fact that on-coming traffic has no stop sign.

The second minor thing is when you have multiple lanes of road or entry ramps to a highway where the lanes merge and signs say the left lane ends!  Again this does not make logical sense.  Merging traffic in the US comes in from the right lane the vast majority of the time.  The right lane is the slow or merge/exit lane.  Faster traffic is encouraged to use the left lanes, implying they have priority.  Why tell a priority lane that the lane ends…… merge into the right lane……. and sometimes when you reach the end of the entry ramp you have to merge left again?   These little things just bug me from time to time.DSC_0010

Letter # 305 

I like to drive around cities and country sides.  It becomes obvious after a bit of traveling that some cities are better planned and have more logical systems in place than others.  I would love to have the ear of some city planners because it is clear they do not PLAN for growth and other transportation needs early enough.  I would like to share some of my thoughts with you, and hopefully you will share yours here as well.  Who knows, maybe we can get the attention of a few city planners while we are it!

One thing I would really like to see changed is the location of many schools.  I know there are good reasons, but all too often they are located on the main strip through towns of all sizes.  I thought about posting pictures as examples, but we have all seen them.  My guess is this makes the land rather expensive for all tax payers.  Or to look at it another way, the land is of commercial value and interest to local businesses.  A number of businesses could pay fair price for the prime locations and exposure the real estate could provide and that would translate to higher tax collected and business success in the area.

Now consider if the schools would be located a few blocks away from “the main drag” going through town.  Your children will be safer crossing the streets and playing in the area due to reduced traffic around the school.  People that are not supposed to be there would be more obvious if they are loitering around the area.  This would reduce risk to students.

Now that the school is not on the main road, traffic flow will be improved by not restricting speeds in school zones, reducing congestion in parts of town most people will have to travel through daily or at least quite often.  I understand this might mean a loss of revenue by reducing speeding violations through school zones, but I think we can live with that!

What do you think?  Do you see more reasons to adopt this policy?  Do you think there are reasons or situations where this would not be beneficial?

Let me know what bothers you about travel through your city and in other locations.  Who knows, maybe we can suggest changes that will help a lot of people.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The songs in this session are simple two-channel recordings.  These are not multi-tracks of isolated instruments to be mixed down later.  This is down and dirty history.  I enjoyed recording and listening to each of the gigs.  The rest of the band were ok with it, but they were really into the performance and live audience vibe.  As a result, I did not get much assistance or cooperation with my projects.  We never did a sound check for recording levels.  We did not set up differently or use additional gear.  I usually taped separate mixes from their sound board or by using a combination of mono mix and single hi-quality microphone up on stage.  See my LSR series for recording configurations.

Unlike the other players I have jammed with, I had not been playing in bands since I was a teenager.  I did not start playing in front of a ‘real’ audience until I was probably 31 or older.  I started playing keyboards (technically different than playing a piano or organ) when I was 30.  Before that I wrote songs and played my 12 string guitar for parties and such but that was about it.

Lacking confidence and years to sharpen my skills, I tried to make up for it in other ways.  I practiced a lot                     compared to the other players.

I helped in tech – light – sound – marketing.  The recordings were for me, LOL!

This is a live recording of a medley we came up with.  None of us really liked disco, but no rocket science to keeping guys in the club is to keep the girls on the dance floor!  We smashed together popular dance songs and other select songs toward the end of the 2nd set.  Enjoy.

 

 

 

Here is another live recording from my band, The Chase.  Those were good times.  This is a cover tune from The Beatles – “She’s So Heavy”.  I remember when I first heard this song on the radio.  It absolutely blew me away.  What fun to play this one out live.

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here is another song my brother David recorded at a studio years ago as part of his Studio Way project.  My brother wrote the lyrics and is the vocalist on these tracks.  Terry Boehm played keyboards.  Tom Collier wrote the music and played guitar.  This one is called, “Focus On Your Feet”.  A fun toe-tapping song that sticks in your head!

The songs were being finalized in the studio as each came up to record.  The rhythm tracks were recorded first, with lead instruments and vocals added later that day.  A lot of people ‘freeze up’ their first time in a studio with the tape rolling (yes, this was back in the days when they used tape!) so recording can be very stressful – but with a bit of focus you can come out with great memories.

 

I have live recordings of almost every band I have in.  I record a lot of practice sessions but mostly live performances in front of audiences.  Many recordings are less than ideal situations and often I experiment with unusual techniques searching for a method that will get great results in almost any stage setting.  I threatened to share some of these with you and this is a good a time as any to start!  Some will sound better than others, and some performances will be better, but all should give you a little blast from my past!  Please check out my Live Sound Reinforcement series for the big picture, or if you are interested in learning about LSR.

This one is “Run Like Hell”  From Pink Floyd.

Greg Stern

MSK Studio

Part of the challenge in writing songs is how difficult it might be to convey a particular feeling or message to studio musicians.  All players should be heading in the same direction, playing the same tune, moving at the same tempo and so on.  Creating soundscapes must be a lot like painting.  Drawing the lines and forms are one thing, but which color is best?  There are so many available yet each one conveys a unique mood or feeling.  Sounds can be like that.  We asked a guitar player/friend of ours to come up with guitar tracks for a project I was working on.   This was for a cable TV project looking for sound tracks for an automotive enthusiast series.  We wanted to give the guitar parts a bit of mood setting so we asked him to create tracks that would generate the feeling of …

an engine or racing car, crunchy, powerful

drive – movement – acceleration, fast, fluid

Using basically no more than the above “instructions” he gathered toys and used the word imagery to shape the sound and the playing style for these tracks.  We used the same list to come up with the basic tracks for the song.  This song is an adaptation of a song I wrote a long time ago and we called it The Big D Jam.  I originally composed this song using the Arp Odyssey synthesizer.  I programmed a pretty cool sounding bass patch and came up with the bass line and skeleton of the song.  This song in its original version was performed when I was with The Personal Touch years ago.  If it was a rockin’ crowd we would let Ric Ahlers jam a bit on the solo parts.  I put some simple lyrics to it and it was a really fun song to play out.  Recently I pulled it out of the song closet and re-wrote the chorus.  I also used new software plug-ins from my computer for all the sounds.  This was amazing for me because I have all this fancy gear with cool sounds and I am not using them at all.  In this post, I wanted to give you an idea how the song progressed. The new sounds are just amazingly clear and natural.  I will post in the near future the complete mix with vocals and effects.  When the sounds and the performance match the request or target, the song seems like it was made to order.