Performing with other musicians requires a deeper channel of communication than normal language. When creating in this environment, every nuance has a meaning.  Every motif can create musical ripples.  Sometimes, two thoughts are better than one.  Co-writing can take a piece further than you would have thought possible on your own.  Try it.  You might like what comes out of it.  Over the years I have worked with a group of songwriters.  Each writer diving in to show off the latest and greatest.  While in one of those small traveling bands from hotel to hotel, I was playing in Corpus Christie TX.  We played a lot of different music for three people, and one of us did not play any instruments.  We wanted to come up with something with a bit more country flavor, and the lead guitarist was working on some soft ballad type chords during practice.  I told him I had written some lyrics that might fit.  I had finally given myself the title of songwriter as you know, so a while back I challenged myself to write a country song.  I had something specific in mind.

I write a lot of songs.  I write a lot of lyrics that never become songs (not yet anyway).  I write a lot of poems that may never become lyrics.  I write a number of songs and I might not even have a recording of it, even though I love to archive and preserve original performances.  Some songs I write for others and do not have a real interest in recording myself.  Maybe because I already have a good idea of what the song is supposed to sound like when a real performer/band records it.  I am not putting myself down here.  I simply do not have the talent or resources of famous stars.  You might laugh, but when I was writing the lyrics below, I wrote them as a duet for some famous country music stars at the time;  Kenny Rodgers and Dolly Parton!

I have only one recording of this song and I will share it with you, Kenny and Dolly you too if you’re listening!  I am singing the male part on this recording.  Not sure if this was ready before we moved on from Corpus Christie to another hotel, but it fell together quickly with the ballad chords at practice, so we performed it live to the more country leaning southern audience.  We were surprised that it went over so well and people in the hotel/audience that were regulars, were singing the words after a few nights in town.  So, I will probably never record this song.  It has always been a distant dream to one day hear others recording this as their own.    I have already heard in my mind what it sounds like with them performing, but this live two-track recording is not too bad for a working representation.

Comments
  1. zachbissett says:

    I miss being in a band because it was the only time I felt comfortable as a creative collaborator, and even then it was only music. Nothing like getting five friends together in a basement and gradually building a song.

    Once words are involved, however, I just can’t work with others. I mostly write fiction these days but I have friends who are professional song writers and I constantly ask them how the heck they spends hours at a time in a room with a complete stranger, writing lyrics.

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      I have to admit I am a bit of a tyrant when it comes to the words of a song. I am OK when it is collaborative, but if I write it – I get a little weird when someone wants to change them or ignore them. I guess if you are successful at it you can take the attitude and images from an artist and bounce ideas to get the right concept and then ‘fill in the blanks’, not to make it sound simple. I am an introvert by nature and would not perform in front of people if it were not for the fact that you already mentioned; if feels so good (natural, comfortable) to collaborate and blend with other artists.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Its easy to hear why the audience loves this song – the tempo is exactly right but above that – (and apologies coming from one unable to sing) – your vocal harmony in that song is absolutely beautiful. Is that due to the song itself? The beat? The ability you and your partner have? Would it be equally wonderful if sung by Kenny and Dolly? I don’t have a clue. But I know every once in a while a piece of magic happens and it just is…. It’s like the moment of sheer surprise – and such intense loveliness I felt when Lady Gaga sang Julie Andrew’s ‘Sound of Music’ at the Oscars this year. If you had bet me $1000 bucks that Lady Gaga could ever have affected me like that just one day earlier then I surely would have taken and lost that bet. Magic happens. I love your thoughts on it too. I feel like your mind is 100% percent artistic. Its so wonderful that you are using it to create things like this… Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      Wow! I truly appreciate your comments and observations. If you are not a song critic, you probably should be. I am happy with the live recording and with the vocal blend as you pointed out. It was amazing how the song came together and that is probably why I have never thought about recording it again. Maybe I think it would somehow spoil the experience? I am not sure, but I am glad I shared it and humbled by your post. Like many other authors and creative talent out there struggling, I never know how something will be accepted and I try not to let the unknown hold me back. But it is also the thing that moves me forward each day. Thank you again.

      Like

      • You’re very flattering Mike, but more importantly – I think talented. I think God gives us all something unique – and your gift is definitely song. As a novice learning piano – I certainly know what it means to have a ‘good play,’ because almost all of mine are laced with the more-than-occasional fat-fingered-key. And that destroys my confidence, I think you might profit from building your own confidence. I’d like to invite you to try doing something with this song. I think tackling something out of our comfort range can make us realize that those things within our comfort range can be expressed as easily and effortlessly as breathing… https://johnallenrichter.wordpress.com/2014/03/09/welcome-to-the-family-son/

        Liked by 1 person

      • midimike says:

        Trust me John, I count my blessings every day. Over the years I have managed to build confidence and a fairly large comfort zone! I like the challenge and will take you up on it. I have a day job and commitments so this will take a while, but you’re on.

        Like

  3. Ellar Wise says:

    Very Nice. I hope Kenny Rodgers and Dolly Parton get a chance to listen to it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. mytiturk says:

    Enjoyed the right-on and insightful lyrics to this song and your thoughts on co-writers. I spend too little time writing – not driven in that direction, so they don’t come easily. Thanks for following my blog. Returning the respect.

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      That is very kind of you. In this song I wrote the lyrics, but in other songs I have help writing the lyrics or the music. Maybe find someone you can partner with to help make writing easier and even fun. It is work at first as you know, but it will get easier.

      Like

  5. sonniq says:

    Ah, so you played Texas, too. I played padre island to Del Rio and every piano bar in the city of Houston. Every ski resort in Colorado and many other cities and states. Brought back some old memories

    Like

  6. […] Phyllis Ann, who toured with The Personal Touch and sang on “The Touch” and “Our Bodies Move.”   As the song begins I try to use multiple melody lines in various instrument voicings to […]

    Like

  7. Tom says:

    How about those prompt and early potatoes? Were they dumb? Just askin’

    Like

  8. […] in called The Personal Touch.  He co-authored with me one of my favorite songs I called “For Those Who Wait“.  (With music it was titled: “Our Bodies […]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s