Ideas from songs can and should come from all sorts of things.  I try to observe experiences from other people.  Too many writers base their material on their own personal experience.  This is powerful but has serious drawbacks.  One has to experience nirvana or tragedy in order to write about it.  This can be limiting unless you have a very tumultuous life.  Not good for health and well being of the artist.  So I try to empathize, sympathize and understand the thoughts, mood and feelings of others as they experience life changing events.

I had been a musician with limited access to toys for most of the early years.  Lots of time and not much cash or resources available.  That did not stop me from observing others, and in fact probably offered me the time to observe.  Anyway, a friend of mine and I were walking around and I noticed a person in a wheel chair.  There was another person behind pushing the chair, but something seemed a little unusual for some reason and I kept watching the pair.  IWE naturally thought the person pushing was there to help the person in the wheel chair.  They went up to one of those bank ATM’s and much to my surprise, the person in the wheel chair moved out of the way and the walking person went up to the ATM display.  What moved me to write this song was the fact that I had originally assumed the person walking was assisting the person in the wheel chair.  The person standing started to use the ATM and they searched by hand for the braille instructions!  The person walking was blind, and being assisted by the person in the wheel chair!  We can touch others in so many different ways.  That lead me to the lyrics and a better understanding of human beings.  Not just their ability to assist others in ways we might not think of, but also how we (I) perceived something and came up with the wrong conclusion.  I use a phrase that describes that effect;  Many people have the correct observation but come to incorrect conclusions.  This song, the lyrics and the music, mean a lot to me personally.  I truly hope you find something here you can relate to.

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/perigee

Comments
  1. Never to judge the book from its cover – the same thing. What we see is not the same when to experience it when you are right there. It can be an illusion and the truth hides itself very well in other people’s skin. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      Exactly. Funny how we all know the cliche’s, but we rarely know when they apply to us!!! This is not a bad thing but we all apply our personal experiences to others. Sometimes this brings us to the wrong conclusion. Thank you for your comment and patience. I almost lost your post as I learn how all this works!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I loved the story and the song.

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      Thank you very much. I am not strong on ballad-type songs. The subject just hit me so hard. I will have to check old records to see if the lyrics or the music came first, but I knew they were right for each other immediately. This is still one of my favorite pieces. I am glad you enjoyed the story as well. Maybe when I get rich (HA!) I will do a video as I remember every step taken along the wheel chair journey and the images are very powerful. Share and enjoy!

      Like

  3. David Kennedy says:

    I never knew the story behind this song; always liked it, but now that I know the backstory it comes alive. Touch someone, as you always do.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. t.dot says:

    wow. awesome story!!! great song and lyrics. thanks for the follow of my mere life experiences 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      You are wonderful. It makes me smile that it related to you enough to comment. But please understand this song and a few others are just that….. sharing “mere life experiences”. But sometimes knowing the background carries a powerful message. You also have stories to share. I am inspired by your mere life LOL. …keep it up!

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  5. krysiakorsak says:

    What a humbling story. One can never assume, judge, take for granted etc in this life. You just never know…thanks for liking my blog and dropping by, and keep up the great music ‘imput’ and ‘output’. It was good to read also your life’s journey so far…Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      Much appreciated. And you nailed it. We should not even take it for granted. We need to learn to look at everything from different perspectives whenever possible. “The truth is out there”, we just need to close our eyes once in a while to see it. Glad to have you on-board! You are very welcome.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. What a great post! Life is always surprising! I believe what makes us writers, artists and poets (and songwriters) is our ability to observe – we are great people watchers and story tellers.

    One of the most amazing experiences of my life was being in a wheelchair for 8 weeks. I was astounded by the view and the perception of people around me. Before I thought wheelchair access was over the top, political correctness gone mad, but I discovered that we really fall short. Three experiences stood out most, I hope you don’t mind me sharing:

    1 – I was in a busy shopping centre in an electric wheelchair. I noticed I was on a collision course with a young girl who was looking at her mobile phone and not where she was going. I could not go left or right because of the crowds around me. A instant before we hit, I must have caught her eye, but astoundingly, she then spent the next few minutes (which felt like an eternity) swearing and cursing me for getting in her way!

    2 – I was being pushed in a wheelchair and we had just come out of a museum the dropped curb was a few feet away and as we headed towards it a delivery van parked in front of it. When we pointed out to him that he was blocking our ability to cross the road, he told us he would not be long and disappeared for 5 minutes. We were left waiting for him, he could have parked a few feet forwards or backwards, (There were no other cars parked at all) but it was too much trouble.

    3 – Again in an electric wheelchair, this time Ikea heading for the disabled toilet. I could not open the door – the wheelchair could not go sideways as the door opened outwards. I was stranded until a lovely lady came and opened it for me. I remember crying in that toilet, because it was the first time I had to depend on a stranger for something so basic, it was humbling indeed.

    Being in a wheelchair was the most valuable experience in my life and the thing that kept me going was knowing I would eventually walk again. Others don’t get that option.

    Like

    • midimike says:

      This is very beautiful. I am on break at lunch and little time to respond now, but I had to send a quick note of gratitude for your post and your thoughts. This was precious. More when I get out of work. Thank you!!! And happy Friday

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you Mike for you kind words.

        Liked by 1 person

      • midimike says:

        In the unfortunate situation where you required a wheel chair, you used your experiences to learn an amazing number of truths (or lessons) in life. You came out of it knowing things you could not have otherwise. This is what makes humans amazing and you are what I affectionately call “a decent human being”! Rather than take it as bad luck or unfair, you gained important perspectives;
        – what seems excessive to those blessed with resources (education, money, health, on and on and on…) can be critical to those without. [walk a mile in my shoes]
        – Those with resources are more likely to blame you than assist you when in need. [lower and middle class citizens usually out-contribute the well off in proportion of donations to charities]
        – Everyone in this busy world gets trapped into thinking that their time is more precious than yours. They expect assistance but rarely help others. [You created your own problems ….. or you deserve them …]
        I could go on, but you turned this into understanding and appreciation, rather than going toward the dark side. Thank you for being a decent human being. There are a lot more like us out there than they would have you think. Good to know you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh Mike thank you for your lovely comment, you are so right about walking a mile in someone else’s shoes. (or wheelchair) in this instance.
        I think you have a good point, about lower class contributing more to charity.
        I think everyone is trapped into believing that they have ‘no time’ and yet they spend a great deal of their lives tranquillised by television.

        Good to know you too, Mike , and keep on blogging I enjoy reading your posts.

        Liked by 1 person

      • midimike says:

        You are very welcome. Frankly, simply writing posts and telling stories of past events is fun and all, but truly, being able to meet you and others, to hear your comments and reflections of genuine concern and passion have been literally overwhelming. What I thought was a cute blogging project has turned into something much much more. I would rather know you and hear how many of us are able to relate to shared experiences than be tranquilized by television – great phrase, by the way! I feel the more I learn about you, the more similarities I see between us. Your head and heart are in the right place!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. K. Adonna says:

    I appreciate this so very much. Humanity, and the general workings of the world, offer an endless supply of inspiration. Expressing what is inside of me is sometimes cathartic but the older I grow, the more art I see in others. Thank you for the reminder. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      I am glad to hear this struck you as hoped. Expressing ourselves is something we also take for granted. We who grab a pen as easily as others might grab a hammer or spread sheet, are blessed in an unusual way. Sometimes it is difficult to simply express our feelings and inspirations. We see others using ‘simple’ tools to communicate, yet we lack the confidence or the practical history needed to use those tools. In spite of the cathartic feelings and trepidation, we keep moving forward. Seeing it in others is another great asset most people do not master. You have many strengths, and I appreciate your comments.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Tom Robinson says:

    Midimike, you have got to be the most responsive blogger in the universe. Your story was worthwhile. The attached song is super-hot. You gotta get that girl back in the studio and feed her some more touch!

    Liked by 1 person

    • midimike says:

      This has always been one of my favorite original songs. The times we lived in amplified the events to ‘overload’ as you know. This song started out with raw emotion and was recorded quickly after completion. As a recording partner, you know how much I love to record (as much as I can…) first takes. Many times they present the most accurate interpretation if not the most free. We fine tuned sections here and there but for the most part, the recordings were done with a few passes through and then I did this mix. I really try to stay on top of the comments and visits, I am still amazed at the thoughtful followers. I have been ‘in touch’ with the vocalist and making plans to jam again. I will let you know.

      Like

  9. […] intro and break vocals are from Phyllis Ann, who toured with The Personal Touch and sang on “The Touch” and “Our Bodies Move.”   As the song begins I try to use multiple melody […]

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